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Steptoe Cyberblog

Episode 239: The Ministry of Silly Talk

Posted in CFIUS, China, International, Security Programs & Policies

 

Today’s interview is a deep (and long – over an hour) dive into new investment review regulations for the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS). It’s excerpted from an ABA panel discussion on the topic, featuring: Tom Feddo, who currently oversees CFIUS; Aimen Mir, who used to oversee CFIUS; Sanchi Jayaram, who is in charge of the Justice Department’s CFIUS and Team Telecom work; David Fagan, a noted CFIUS practitioner; and me as moderator. It turns out the new CFIUS law may be the most innovative – and sweeping – piece of legislation on national security in years.

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Episode 238: Bold Prediction Episode: Foreign governments will not hack this election

Posted in China, International, Security Programs & Policies

 

This episode puts our experts on the spot with an election-eve question: Will foreign governments attack US electoral rolls or vote-counting machinery in 2018? Remarkably, no one on our panel (Matthew Heiman, Nick Weaver, David Kris, and I) thinks they will. So if you want cybersecurity news, you can stop listening to election coverage and tune in to Episode 238 of The Cyberlaw Podcast.

Our interview features Steve Rice (Deputy CIO for DHS) and Max Everett (CIO for the Department of Energy) and was originally taped at a session of the Homeland Security Week conference.

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Episode 237: I’d Like to Teach the World to Troll, in Perfect Harmony!

Posted in China, Data Breach, European Union, International, Privacy Regulation, Russia

 

The theme of this week’s podcast seems to be the remarkable reach of American soft power: Really, we elect Donald Trump, and suddenly everybody’s trolling. The Justice Department criminally charges a Russian troll factory’s accountant, and before David Kris can finish explaining it, she’s on YouTube, trolling the prosecutors with a housewife schtick. She’s not alone. Faced with the news that President Trump is using a commercial iPhone for many of his calls – and, Nate Jones points out, getting tapped by China, Russia, and others as a result – China has a suggestion that scores at the top of the POTUS Troll Scale. Tim Cook goes to Europe to troll Android – and me – with a speech that touches all my buttons: Europhilia, Apple sanctimony in pursuit of profit, and blind enthusiasm for privacy regulation. And when the Belgians ask for British help investigating a suspected GCHQ hack of a Belgian ISP, as David and I discuss, the British respond with what can only be described as understated trolling.

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Episode 236: Twitterlaw and the Khashoggi killing

Posted in China, Data Breach, European Union, International, Security Programs & Policies

 

In this episode’s interview we ask whether the midterm elections are likely to suffer as much foreign hacking and interference as we saw in 2016. The answer, from Christopher Krebs, Under Secretary for National Protection and Programs Directorate (soon to be the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency), is surprisingly comforting, though hardly guaranteed. Briefly, it’s beginning to look as though the Russians (and maybe the Iranians) are holding their fire for the main event in 2020.

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Episode 235: It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s … Doug?

Posted in CFIUS, China, European Union, Government Contracts, International, Security Programs & Policies

 

Today we interview Doug, the chief legal officer of GCHQ, the British equivalent of NSA. It’s the first time we’ve interviewed someone whose full identify is classified. Out of millions of possible pseudonyms, he’s sticking with “Doug.” Listen in as he explains why. More seriously, Doug covers the now-considerable oversight regime that governs GCHQ’s intercepts and other intelligence collection, Britain’s view of how the law of war applies in cyberspace, the prospects for UN talks on that topic, the value of attribution, and whether a national security agency should be responsible for civilian cybersecurity (the UK says yes, the US says no).

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Episode 234: The California Turing Test

Posted in China, Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, International, Russia

 

Bloomberg Businessweek’s claim that the Chinese buggered Supermicro motherboards leads off our News Roundup. The story is controversial not because it couldn’t happen and not because the Chinese wouldn’t do it but because the story has been denied by practically everyone close to the controversy, including DHS. Bloomberg Businessweek stands by the story. Maybe it’s time for the law, in the form of a libel action, to ride to the rescue.

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European Data Protection Board Adopts Draft Guidelines on Territorial Scope of General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

Posted in Data Breach, European Union, International, Security Programs & Policies

The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) is an independent advisory body, established by the GDPR, that issues guidelines, recommendations, and best practices for the application of the GDPR.

At its Third Plenary on September 26, the EDPB adopted new draft guidelines on the GDPR’s territorial scope.

These guidelines should help provide a common interpretation of the broad territorial scope of the GDPR, often referred to as its long-arm jurisdiction, and further clarify how the GDPR applies to data controllers or processors established outside of the EU – for example, in the US – targeting individuals in the EU. The Guidelines will include guidance on the requirement to designate a representative in the EU. This is required unless the processing is carried out by a private entity or natural person and (i) is occasional, (ii) does not include, on a large scale, processing of special categories of data or data relating to criminal convictions and offences, and (iii) is unlikely to result in a risk to the rights and freedoms of natural persons.

The guidelines will be subject to public consultation, via the EDPB’s consultation link available here.

Episode 233: Outing the GRU

Posted in Blockchain, Data Breach, European Union, International, Privacy Regulation, Russia

 

In this news-only episode, Nick Weaver and I muse over the outing of a GRU colonel for the nerve agent killings in the United Kingdom. I ask the question that is surely being debated inside MI6 today: Now that he’s been identified, should British intelligence make it their business to execute Col. Chepiga?

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Stewart Baker Appears on This Week in Law

Posted in Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, European Union, International, Security Programs & Policies

Earlier this month, Stewart appeared as a guest on Episode 434 of This Week in Law with Denise Howell.

Members of Congress want to know the potential impact of deepfakes, India’s Aadhaar ID database is hacked, EU could fine companies for not removing terrorist content in an hour, U.S. policy on Cyber warfare, vending machines DDoS a University and more!

Watch and listen to the full episode here:
 

Episode 232: “I’m afraid you can’t say that, Dave.” Will AI save the Internet from Vladimir Putin – and Matt Drudge?

Posted in AI, China, Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, European Union, International, Russia

 

Our guest is Peter W. Singer, co-author with Emerson T. Brooking of LikeWar: The Weaponization of Social Media. Peter’s book is a fine history of the way the Internet went wrong in the Age of Social Media. He thinks we’re losing the Like Wars, and I tend to agree. It’s a deep conversation that turns contentious when we come to his prescriptions, which I see as reinstating the lefty elite that ran journalism for decades, this time empowered by even less self-doubt – and AI that can reproduce its prejudices at scale and without transparency.

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