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Steptoe Cyberblog

Episode 251: Executive Orders and alien abductions

Posted in AI, CFIUS, China, European Union, International, Russia

 

The backlash against Big Tech dominates the episode, with new regulatory initiatives in the US, EU, Israel, Russia, and China. The misbegotten link tax and upload filter provisions of the EU copyright directive have survived the convoluted EU legislative gantlet. My prediction: the link tax will fail because Google wants it to fail, but the upload filter will succeed because Google wants YouTube’s competitors to fail.

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Episode 250: We give you Weaver

Posted in China, European Union, International, Privacy Regulation, Security Programs & Policies

 

If you get SMS messages on your phone and think you have two-factor authentication, you’re kidding yourself. That’s the message Nick Weaver and David Kris extract from two stories we cover in this week’s episode of The Cyberlaw Podcast – DOJ’s indictment of a couple of kids whose hacker chops are modest but whose social engineering skillz are remarkable. They used those skills to bribe or bamboozle phone companies into changing the phone numbers of their victims, allowing them to intercept all the two-factor authentication they needed to steal boatloads of cryptocurrency. For those with better hacking chops than social skills, there’s always exploitation of SS7 vulnerabilities, which allow interception of text messages without all the muss and fuss of changing SIM cards.

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Episode 249: Black swans, black ops, BlackCube, and red herrings

Posted in Data Breach, International, Russia, Security Programs & Policies

 

In this episode, I interview Chris Bing and Joel Schectman about their remarkable stories covering the actions of what amount to US cyber-mercenary hackers. We spare a moment of sympathy for one of those hackers, Lori Stroud, who managed to go from hiring Edward Snowden to hacking for the UAE in the space of a few years.

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An Overview of Blockchain Cybersecurity Risks and Issues

Posted in Block Chain, Blockchain, Data Breach

Our blockchain colleagues recently published an article on the rapidly evolving landscape where blockchain intersects with data security and privacy. If you’ve ever wondered how blockchains can be considered secure even though hacks of cryptocurrency exchanges routinely make headlines, or whether distributing a permanent ledger to every participant in a network might run afoul of privacy laws and regulations then be sure to check out “Cybersecurity Tech Basics: Blockchain Technology Cyber Risks and Issues” and learn more about these issues.”

Episode 248: Tomayto, Tomahto: Right to be Forgotten Meets Right to Die

Posted in China, European Union, International, Privacy Regulation, Russia

 

If the surgeon about to operate on you has been disciplined for neglecting patients, wouldn’t you like to know? Well, the mandarins of the European Union privacy lobby beg to differ. Google has been told by a Dutch court not to index that story, and there seems to have been a six-month lag in disclosing even the court ruling. That’s part of this week’s News Roundup. Gus Hurwitz and I are appalled. I tout my long-standing view that in the end, privacy law just protects the privileged. Gus agrees.

The interview is with John Carlin, author of Dawn of the Code War. It’s a great inside story of how we came to indict China’s hacker-spies for attacking US companies.

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Episode 247: “If I save Earth, you’re gonna owe me.”

Posted in International

 

So says the remarkable Jeff Jonas, CEO of Senzing. And he’s got a claim to be doing just that. A data scientist before data science was cool, Jeff has used his technical skills and an intuitive grasp of complex data problems to stop card counters in Las Vegas and terrorists targeting the US, and then to launch an initiative making voter registration more accurate and widespread. Most recently, in the course of an effort to improve maritime security around Singapore, he also found a key to identifying asteroids that are about to collide with each other and head off on a new course (one that might intersect with, well, ours).

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Episode 246: Russia’s Successful Search for Deterrence on the Cheap

Posted in European Union, International, Russia

 

Brazen Russian intrusions into the US electricity grid lead our episode. I ask Matthew Heiman and Nick Weaver whether Russia intended for us to know about their intrusions (duh, yes!) and how we should respond to the implicit threat to leave Americans freezing in the dark. Their answers and mine show creativity if not exactly sobriety.

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Episode 245: “Pay no attention to the guns, the flashbang, and the handcuffs. You’re free to go at any time.”

Posted in AI, China, Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, Data Breach, International

 

Nate Jones, David Kris, and I kick off 2019 with a roundup of the month of news since we took our Christmas break. First, we break down the utterly predictable but undismissable Silicon Valley claim that the administration’s new export control strategy will hurt the emerging AI industry.

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Episode 244: Blockchain Takes Over The Podcast

Posted in Blockchain, CFIUS, Virtual Currency

 

On December 17th, Alan Cohn hosted the 244th episode of The Cyberlaw Podcast. We took a deep dive into all things blockchain and cryptocurrency, discussing recent regulatory developments and projections for 2019.

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Episode 243: Tech World Turned Upside Down Down Under

Posted in China, Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, International

 

In the News Roundup, Nick Weaver and I offer very different assessments of Australia’s controversial encryption bill. Nick’s side of the argument is bolstered by Denise Howell, the original legal podcaster, with 445 weekly episodes of This Week in Law to her credit.

Later in the program, I interview Rep. Jim Langevin (D-RI), who’s a force for cybersecurity both on the Homeland Security Committee and on the Armed Services subcommittee that oversees Cyber Command and DARPA – a subcommittee that insiders expect him to be chairing in the next Congress.

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