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Michael Vatis has spent most of his career addressing cutting edge issues at the intersection of law, policy, and technology. Michael's practice focuses on Internet, e-commerce, and technology matters, providing legal advice and strategic counsel on matters involving privacy, security, encryption, intelligence, law enforcement, Internet gambling, and international regulation of Internet content.

It seems we can’t go a day without another bombshell in what we can now call the “Snowden Affair.” Many people are calling Edward Snowden a “whistleblower” for leaking two classified intelligence programs. But that term is usually reserved for someone who reveals government lies, law-breaking, or malfeasance. What Snowden revealed, though, are government

The Federal Trade Commission is really on a roll these days. In the last few weeks alone it has: reached settlements with two companies, Compete, Inc. and Epic Marketplace, Inc., over the FTC’s charges that the two companies deceived consumers by misrepresenting their online data collection practices; released a blistering report criticizing the developers

It’s been a contentious meeting in Dubai at the World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT), where the United States and its allies have been trying to fend off efforts by Russia, China, and others to expand the writ of the International Telecommunications Union to cover the Internet. Besides that fundamental dispute, there have been some

For those who have wondered why the feds cared about what former CIA Director David Petraeus was doing on his private email account, recent reports on hacks into the personal computers of former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mike Mullen provide at least a clue. Mullen’s personal computers, which he used while working

California Attorney General Kamala Harris announced yesterday that she is creating a Privacy Enforcement and Protection Unit in her office. The PEPU, which will consist of six prosecutors, will be responsible for prosecuting companies that violate the state’s privacy laws.

California, of course, has been at the vanguard of privacy protection, enacting the nation’s first