The big news of the week was a Fifth Circuit decision upholding Texas social media regulation law. It was poorly received by the usual supporters of social media censorship but I found it both remarkably well written and surprisingly persuasive. That does not mean it will survive the almost inevitable Supreme Court review but

  • Gus Hurwitz brings us up to speed on tech bills in Congress. They are all dead, but some of them don’t know it yet. The big privacy bill, American Data Privacy and Protection Act, was killed by the left, but I argue that it’s the right that should be celebrating, since the bill

This is our return-from-hiatus episode. Jordan Schneider kicks things off by recapping passage of a major U.S. semiconductor-building subsidy bill, while new contributor Brian Fleming talks with Nick Weaver about new regulatory investment restrictions and new export controls on (artificial Intelligence (AI) chips going to China. Jordan also covers a big corruption scandal

Kicking off a packed episode, the Cyberlaw Podcast calls on Megan Stifel to cover the first Cyber Safety Review Board (CSRB) report. The CSRB does exactly what those of us who supported the idea hoped it would do – provide an authoritative view of how the Log4J incident unfolded along with some practical advice

Dave Aitel introduces a deliciously shocking story about lawyers as victims and – maybe – co-conspirators in the hacking of adversaries’ counsel to win legal disputes. The trick, it turns out, is figuring out how to benefit from hacked documents without actually dirtying one’s hands with the hacking. And here too, a Shakespearean Henry

For decades, U.S. cyber exploits were notoriously lawyer-ridden, to the point where it was a key element of attribution. But it looks like Israel has matched and surpassed U.S. cyberwarriors. In an attack claimed by some “hacktivist” group but widely attributed to Israel, Nate Jones reports, several Iranian mills shut down in a flood

At least that’s the lesson that Paul Rosenzweig and I distill from the recent 11th Circuit decision mostly striking down Florida’s law regulating social media platforms’ content “moderation” rules. We disagree flamboyantly on pretty much everything else – including whether the Court will intervene before judgment in a pending 5thCircuit

Is the European Union (EU) about to rescue the FBI from Going Dark? Jamil Jaffer and Nate Jones tell us that a new directive aimed at preventing child sex abuse might just do the trick, a position backed by people who’ve been fighting the bureau on encryption for years.

The Biden administration is

Retraction: An earlier episode of the Cyberlaw Podcast may have left the impression that I think Google hates mothers. I regret the error. It appears that, in reality, Google only hates Republican mothers who are running for office. But to all appearances, Google really, really hates them. A remarkable, and apparently damning study disclosed

I’m unable to resist pointing out the profound bias built into everything Silicon Valley does these days. Google, it turns out, is planning to tell enterprise users of its word processor that words like “motherboard” and “landlord” are insufficiently inclusive for use in polite company. We won’t actually be forbidden to use those words.