This episode of the Cyberlaw Podcast delves into the use of location technology in two big events – the surprisingly outspoken lockdown protests in China and the January 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. Both were seen as big threats to the government, and both produced aggressive police responses that relied heavily on government

The Cyberlaw Podcast leads with the legal cost of Elon Musk’s anti-authoritarian takeover of Twitter. Turns out that authority figures have a lot of weapons, many grounded in law, and Twitter is at risk of being on the receiving end of those weapons. Brian Fleming explores the apparently unkillable notion that the Committee on

David Kris opens this episode of the Cyberlaw Podcast by laying out some of the massive disruption that the Biden Administration has kicked off in China’s semiconductor industry – and its Western suppliers. The reverberations of the administration’s new measures will be felt for years, and the Chinese government’s response, not to mention

  • Gus Hurwitz brings us up to speed on tech bills in Congress. They are all dead, but some of them don’t know it yet. The big privacy bill, American Data Privacy and Protection Act, was killed by the left, but I argue that it’s the right that should be celebrating, since the bill

Dave Aitel introduces a deliciously shocking story about lawyers as victims and – maybe – co-conspirators in the hacking of adversaries’ counsel to win legal disputes. The trick, it turns out, is figuring out how to benefit from hacked documents without actually dirtying one’s hands with the hacking. And here too, a Shakespearean Henry