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Category Archives: International

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Episode 286: Sandworm and the GRU’s global intifada

Posted in Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, International, Russia

  This episode is a wide-ranging interview with Andy Greenberg, author of Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin’s Most Dangerous Hackers. The book contains plenty of original reporting, served up with journalistic flair. It digs deep into some of the most startling and destructive cyberattacks of recent years, from… Continue Reading

Episode 285: ByteDance bitten by CFIUS

Posted in CFIUS, China, International

  We open the episode with David Kris’s thoughts on the two-years-late CFIUS investigation of TikTok, its Chinese owner, ByteDance, and ByteDance’s US acquisition of the lip-syncing company Musical.ly. Our best guess is that this unprecedented reach-back investigation will end in a more or less precedented mitigation agreement.

Episode 284: A throuple can keep a secret – if a couple of them are dead

Posted in China, International

    You knew we’d go there. I talk about Congresswoman Katie Hill’s “throuple” pics and whether the rush to portray her as a victim of revenge porn raises questions about revenge porn laws themselves. Paul Rosenzweig, emboldened by twin tweets – from President Trump calling Never-Trumpers like him “human scum” and from Mark Hamill… Continue Reading

Episode 283: Is intelligence “reform” a self-licking ice cream cone and compliance trap?

Posted in Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, International, Privacy Regulation, Security Programs & Policies

  Our interview is with Alex Joel, former Chief of the Office of Civil Liberties, Privacy, and Transparency at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence. Alex is now at the American University law school’s Tech, Law, and Security Program. We share stories about the difficulties of government startups and how the ODNI carved… Continue Reading

Episode 281: Can the European Union order Twitter to silence President Trump?

Posted in China, European Union, International, Privacy Regulation

  Today’s episode opens with a truly disturbing bit of neocolonial judicial lawmaking from the Court of Justice of the European Union. The CJEU ruled that an Austrian court can order Facebook to take down statements about an Austrian politician. Called an “oaf” and a “fascist,” the politician more or less proved the truth of… Continue Reading

Episode 280: Challenging Edward Snowden

Posted in International

  In this episode I cross swords with John Samples of the Cato Institute on Silicon Valley’s efforts to disadvantage conservative speech and what to do about it. I accuse him of Panglossian libertarianism; he challenges me to identify any way in which bringing government into the dispute will make things better. I say government… Continue Reading

Episode 278: Will international trade law prevent the US from regulating the security of the Internet of Things?

Posted in International, Security Programs & Policies

  Joel Trachtman thinks it’s a near certainty that the WTO agreements will complicate US efforts to head off an IoT cybersecurity meltdown, and there’s a real possibility that a US cybersecurity regime could be held to violate our international trade obligations. Claire Schachter and I dig into the details of the looming disaster and… Continue Reading

Episode 277: Bankrupting National Security?

Posted in China, European Union, International

  Camille Stewart talks about a little-known national security risk: China’s propensity to acquire US technology through the bankruptcy courts and the many ways in which the bankruptcy system isn’t set up to combat improper tech transfers. Published by the Journal of National Security Law & Policy, Camille’s paper is available here. Camille has enjoyed… Continue Reading

Episode 276: Alex Stamos on Electoral Interference in Taiwan

Posted in China, International

  In this bonus episode of the Cyberlaw Podcast, Alex Stamos of Stanford’s Freeman Spogli Institute talks about the Institute’s recent paper on the risk of Chinese social media interference with Taiwan’s upcoming presidential election. It’s a wide-ranging discussion of everything from a century of Chinese history to the reasons why WeChat lost a social… Continue Reading

Episode 274: Will Silicon Valley have to choose between end-to-end crypto and shutting down speech it hates?

Posted in AI, China, International, Russia

  Our guests this week are Paul Scharre from the Center for a New American Security and Greg Allen from the Defense Department’s newly formed Joint Artificial Intelligence Center. Paul and Greg have a lot to say about AI policy, especially with an eye toward national security and strategic competition. Greg sheds some light on… Continue Reading

Episode 272: Illuminating supply chain security

Posted in China, European Union, International, Security Programs & Policies

  What is the federal government doing to get compromised hardware and software out of its supply chain? That’s what we ask Harvey Rishikof, coauthor of “Deliver Uncompromised,” and Joyce Corell, who heads the Supply Chain and Cyber Directorate at the National Counterintelligence and Security Center. There’s no doubt the problem is being admired to… Continue Reading

Episode 271: Is social media a disease, and how do we treat it?

Posted in AI, China, International

  This week I interview Glenn Reynolds, of Instapundit and the UT Knoxville law school, about his new book, The Social Media Upheaval. In a crisp 64 pages, Glenn analogizes social media to a primeval city, where new proximity produces periodic outbreaks of diseases that more isolated people never experienced; traces social media’s toxicity to the… Continue Reading

Episode 270: China’s cyber offense comes of age

Posted in CFIUS, Cloud Computing, International, Security Programs & Policies

  The theme this week is China’s growing confidence in using cyberweapons in new and sophisticated ways, as the US struggles to find an answer to China’s growing ambition to dominate technology. Our interview guest, Chris Bing of Reuters, talks about his deep dive story on Chinese penetration of managed service providers like HP Enterprise… Continue Reading

Episode 269: A McLaughlin Group for cybersecurity

Posted in Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, International, Security Programs & Policies

  Our interview guests are Dick Clarke and Rob Knake, who have just finished their second joint book on cybersecurity, The Fifth Domain. We talk about what they got right and wrong in their original book. There are surprising flashes of optimism from Clarke and Knake about the state of cybersecurity, and the book itself… Continue Reading

Episode 267: “Call me a fascist again and I’ll get the government to shut you up. Worldwide.”

Posted in Data Breach, European Union, International, Russia

  We kick off Episode 267 with Gus Hurwitz reading the runes to see whether a 50-year Chicago winter for antitrust plaintiffs is finally thawing in Silicon Valley. Gus thinks the predictions of global antitrust warming are overhyped. But he recognizes we’re seeing an awful lot of robins on the lawn: The rise of Margrethe Vestager… Continue Reading

Episode 265: Cheapfakes and the end of blackmail

Posted in China, Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, International

  Paul Rosenzweig leads off with This Week in China Tech Fear – an enduring and fecund feature in Washington these days. We cover the Trump Administration’s plan to blacklist up to five Chinese surveillance companies, including Hikvision, for contributing to Uighur human rights violations in the West of China, DHS’s rather bland warning that… Continue Reading

Episode 264: Unpacking the Supreme Court’s decision in Pepper v. Apple

Posted in China, European Union, International, Security Programs & Policies

  We begin this episode with a quick tour of the Apple antitrust decision that pitted two Trump appointees against each other in a 5-4 decision. Matthew Heiman and I consider the differences in judging styles that produced the split and the role that 25 years of “platform billionaires” may have played in the decision.