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Steptoe Cyberblog

Tag Archives: Facebook

Episode 285: ByteDance bitten by CFIUS

Posted in CFIUS, China, International

  We open the episode with David Kris’s thoughts on the two-years-late CFIUS investigation of TikTok, its Chinese owner, ByteDance, and ByteDance’s US acquisition of the lip-syncing company Musical.ly. Our best guess is that this unprecedented reach-back investigation will end in a more or less precedented mitigation agreement.

Episode 284: A throuple can keep a secret – if a couple of them are dead

Posted in China, International

    You knew we’d go there. I talk about Congresswoman Katie Hill’s “throuple” pics and whether the rush to portray her as a victim of revenge porn raises questions about revenge porn laws themselves. Paul Rosenzweig, emboldened by twin tweets – from President Trump calling Never-Trumpers like him “human scum” and from Mark Hamill… Continue Reading

Episode 281: Can the European Union order Twitter to silence President Trump?

Posted in China, European Union, International, Privacy Regulation

  Today’s episode opens with a truly disturbing bit of neocolonial judicial lawmaking from the Court of Justice of the European Union. The CJEU ruled that an Austrian court can order Facebook to take down statements about an Austrian politician. Called an “oaf” and a “fascist,” the politician more or less proved the truth of… Continue Reading

Episode 277: Bankrupting National Security?

Posted in China, European Union, International

  Camille Stewart talks about a little-known national security risk: China’s propensity to acquire US technology through the bankruptcy courts and the many ways in which the bankruptcy system isn’t set up to combat improper tech transfers. Published by the Journal of National Security Law & Policy, Camille’s paper is available here. Camille has enjoyed… Continue Reading

Episode 274: Will Silicon Valley have to choose between end-to-end crypto and shutting down speech it hates?

Posted in AI, China, International, Russia

  Our guests this week are Paul Scharre from the Center for a New American Security and Greg Allen from the Defense Department’s newly formed Joint Artificial Intelligence Center. Paul and Greg have a lot to say about AI policy, especially with an eye toward national security and strategic competition. Greg sheds some light on… Continue Reading

Episode 272: Illuminating supply chain security

Posted in China, European Union, International, Security Programs & Policies

  What is the federal government doing to get compromised hardware and software out of its supply chain? That’s what we ask Harvey Rishikof, coauthor of “Deliver Uncompromised,” and Joyce Corell, who heads the Supply Chain and Cyber Directorate at the National Counterintelligence and Security Center. There’s no doubt the problem is being admired to… Continue Reading

Episode 269: A McLaughlin Group for cybersecurity

Posted in Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, International, Security Programs & Policies

  Our interview guests are Dick Clarke and Rob Knake, who have just finished their second joint book on cybersecurity, The Fifth Domain. We talk about what they got right and wrong in their original book. There are surprising flashes of optimism from Clarke and Knake about the state of cybersecurity, and the book itself… Continue Reading

Episode 262: Udderly indefensible facial recognition scandal may drive new privacy mooovement

Posted in China, International, Privacy Regulation

  Have the Chinese hired American lawyers to vet their cyberespionage tactics – or just someone who cares about opsec? Probably the latter, and if you’re wondering why China would suddenly care about opsec, look no further than Supermicro’s announcement that it will be leaving China after a Bloomberg story claiming that the company’s supply… Continue Reading

Episode 257: How we know the North Korean Embassy break-in wasn’t the work of the CIA

Posted in Data Breach, International, Privacy Regulation

  In today’s News Roundup, Klon Kitchen adds to the North Korean Embassy invasion by an unknown group. Turns out some of the participants fled to the US and lawyered up, but the real tipoff about attribution is that they’ve given some of the data they stole to the FBI. That rules out CIA involvement… Continue Reading

Episode 253: Where angels fear to tread: NewsGuard takes on fake news

Posted in Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, International, Russia

  Our interview is with two men who overcame careers as lawyers and journalists to become serial entrepreneurs now trying to solve the “fake news” problem. Gordon Crovitz and Steve Brill co-founded NewsGuard to rate news sites on nine journalistic criteria. Using, of all things, real people instead of algorithms. By the end of the… Continue Reading

Episode 252: In the cyber adversary Olympics, it’s Russia for the gold and North Korea (!) for the silver

Posted in China, Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, International, Russia

  We interview Dmitri Alperovitch of CrowdStrike on the company’s 2019 Global Threat Report, which features a ranking of Western cyber adversaries based on how long it takes each of them to turn a modest foothold into code execution on a compromised network. The Russians put up truly frightening numbers – from foothold to execution… Continue Reading

Episode 251: Executive Orders and alien abductions

Posted in AI, CFIUS, China, European Union, International, Russia

  The backlash against Big Tech dominates the episode, with new regulatory initiatives in the US, EU, Israel, Russia, and China. The misbegotten link tax and upload filter provisions of the EU copyright directive have survived the convoluted EU legislative gantlet. My prediction: the link tax will fail because Google wants it to fail, but… Continue Reading

Episode 250: We give you Weaver

Posted in China, European Union, International, Privacy Regulation, Security Programs & Policies

  If you get SMS messages on your phone and think you have two-factor authentication, you’re kidding yourself. That’s the message Nick Weaver and David Kris extract from two stories we cover in this week’s episode of The Cyberlaw Podcast – DOJ’s indictment of a couple of kids whose hacker chops are modest but whose… Continue Reading

Episode 249: Black swans, black ops, BlackCube, and red herrings

Posted in Data Breach, International, Russia, Security Programs & Policies

  In this episode, I interview Chris Bing and Joel Schectman about their remarkable stories covering the actions of what amount to US cyber-mercenary hackers. We spare a moment of sympathy for one of those hackers, Lori Stroud, who managed to go from hiring Edward Snowden to hacking for the UAE in the space of… Continue Reading

Episode 241: “You’ll never know how evil a technology can be until the engineers deploying it fear for their jobs”

Posted in International, Security Programs & Policies

  I propose this episode’s title as Baker’s Law of Evil Technology, something that explains Twitter’s dysfunctional woke-ness, Yahoo’s crappy security, and Uber’s deadly autonomous vehicles. Companies with lots of revenue can afford to offer a lot of stuff they don’t much care about, including protection of minority voices, security, and, um, not killing people…. Continue Reading

Episode 239: The Ministry of Silly Talk

Posted in CFIUS, China, International, Security Programs & Policies

  Today’s interview is a deep (and long – over an hour) dive into new investment review regulations for the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS). It’s excerpted from an ABA panel discussion on the topic, featuring: Tom Feddo, who currently oversees CFIUS; Aimen Mir, who used to oversee CFIUS; Sanchi Jayaram,… Continue Reading

Episode 237: I’d Like to Teach the World to Troll, in Perfect Harmony!

Posted in China, Data Breach, European Union, International, Privacy Regulation, Russia

  The theme of this week’s podcast seems to be the remarkable reach of American soft power: Really, we elect Donald Trump, and suddenly everybody’s trolling. The Justice Department criminally charges a Russian troll factory’s accountant, and before David Kris can finish explaining it, she’s on YouTube, trolling the prosecutors with a housewife schtick. She’s… Continue Reading

Social Media Laws Can Be Positively Anti-Social

Posted in Privacy Regulation

According to Dan Balz’s new book, the Obama campaign had its employees and volunteers log onto the campaign’s “Dashboard” application using their Facebook accounts, which allowed the campaign to see each person’s Facebook friend list. The campaign would then match the friends’ names to other information the campaign had amassed showing which of those friends… Continue Reading