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Steptoe Cyberblog

Tag Archives: privacy law

Episode 276: Alex Stamos on Electoral Interference in Taiwan

Posted in China, International

  In this bonus episode of the Cyberlaw Podcast, Alex Stamos of Stanford’s Freeman Spogli Institute talks about the Institute’s recent paper on the risk of Chinese social media interference with Taiwan’s upcoming presidential election. It’s a wide-ranging discussion of everything from a century of Chinese history to the reasons why WeChat lost a social… Continue Reading

Episode 248: Tomayto, Tomahto: Right to be Forgotten Meets Right to Die

Posted in China, European Union, International, Privacy Regulation, Russia

  If the surgeon about to operate on you has been disciplined for neglecting patients, wouldn’t you like to know? Well, the mandarins of the European Union privacy lobby beg to differ. Google has been told by a Dutch court not to index that story, and there seems to have been a six-month lag in… Continue Reading

Why the House Information-Sharing Bill Could Actually Deter Information Sharing

Posted in Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, Privacy Regulation, Security Programs & Policies

The House Intelligence Committee has now adopted a manager’s amendment to what it’s now calling the “Protecting Cyber Networks Act.”  Predictably, privacy groups are already inveighing against it. I fear that the House bill is indeed seriously flawed, but not because it invades privacy.  Instead, it appears to pile unworkable new privacy regulations on the… Continue Reading

Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast – Interview with Paul Rosenzweig

Posted in China, Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, Data Breach, International, Privacy Regulation, Security Programs & Policies

Episode 60 of the Cyberlaw Podcast features Paul Rosenzweig, founder of Red Branch Consulting PLLC and Senior Advisor to The Chertoff Group.  Most importantly he was a superb Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy in the Department of Homeland Security when I was Assistant Secretary. Paul discourses on the latest developments in ICANN, almost persuading me… Continue Reading

Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast – Interview with Dr. Andy Ozment

Posted in China, Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, Data Breach, International, Privacy Regulation, Security Programs & Policies

In episode 58 of the Cyberlaw Podcast, our guest is Andy Ozment, who heads the DHS cybersecurity unit charged with helping improve cybersecurity in the private sector and the civilian agencies of the federal government.  We ask how his agency’s responsibilities differ from NSA’s and FBI’s, quote scripture to question his pronunciation of ISAO, dig… Continue Reading

Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast – Interview with Mike Rogers

Posted in China, Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, Data Breach, International, Privacy Regulation, Security Programs & Policies

This episode of the podcast features Rep. Mike Rogers, former chairman of the House intelligence committee, Doug Kantor, our expert on all things cyber in Congress, and Maury Shenk, calling in from London.  Mike Rogers is now a nationally syndicated radio host on Westwood One, a CNN national security commentator, and an adviser to Trident… Continue Reading

Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast – Interview with Juan Zarate

Posted in Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, Data Breach, International, Privacy Regulation, Security Programs & Policies

Our guest commentator for episode 49 of the Steptoe Cyberlaw podcast is Juan Zarate, a senior adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), the senior national security analyst for CBS News, a visiting lecturer at the Harvard Law School, and chairman and co-founder of the Financial Integrity Network.  Before joining CSIS, Juan… Continue Reading

Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast – Interview with Admiral David Simpson

Posted in Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, Data Breach, Privacy Regulation, Security Programs & Policies

Our guest today is Admiral David Simpson, Chief of the FCC’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.  Admiral Simpson has more than 20 years of Information and Communications Technology experience supporting the Department of Defense.  Adm. Simpson is joined by Clete Johnson, his Chief Counsel for Cybersecurity.  The interview digs deep into Chairman Wheeler’s cybersecurity… Continue Reading

Steptoe Cyberlaw Podcast – Interview with Orin Kerr

Posted in China, Cybersecurity and Cyberwar, Data Breach, International, Privacy Regulation, Security Programs & Policies

Our guest this week is Orin Kerr, professor of law at George Washington University and well-known scholar in computer crime law and Internet surveillance.  Orin is our second return guest, and he demonstrates why, opining authoritatively on the future of NSA’s 215 program and the “mosaic” theory of fourth amendment privacy as well as joining… Continue Reading

Inside Europe’s Censorship Machinery

Posted in International, Privacy Regulation, Security Programs & Policies

Three months ago, I tried hacking Google’s implementation of Europe’s “right to be forgotten.”  For those of you who haven’t followed recent developments in censorship, the right to be forgotten is a European requirement that “irrelevant or outdated” information be excluded from searches about individuals.  The doctrine extends even to true information that remains on… Continue Reading

Verizon’s Response to Orin Kerr’s Posts on the Microsoft Search Warrant Case

Posted in International, Privacy Regulation, Security Programs & Policies

As our readers and podcast listeners know, Steptoe filed an amicus brief for Verizon Communications Inc. in the case in which Microsoft has moved to vacate a search warrant seeking emails located in Ireland.  The issue in the case is whether a US search warrant can be used to obtain the content of emails stored… Continue Reading

A Privacy Law’s “Unintended” But Remarkably Convenient Results

Posted in Privacy Regulation

HIPAA is an arguably well-intentioned privacy law that seems to yield nothing but “unintended” consequences.  I put “unintended” in quotes because the consequences are often remarkably convenient, at least for those with power.  I’m not sure you can call something that convenient “unintended.” The problem has gotten so bad that even National Public Radio and… Continue Reading